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Monday
Dec092013

Practice!

An old joke relates the story of a tourist in New York City who asks someone on the street how he can get to Carnegie Hall. The native New Yorker responds “Practice!” The same can be said for negotiating. Whether you are using a neutral mediator or an advocate (like your attorney or agent), you should never just go to the meeting place and let the negotiations happen. You have to be prepared. Whether it is your job, your business, a real estate transaction, a loan, or some other major sale or purchase, you need to take charge.  And if it is big enough and important to you, get some help.

Attorney and sports agent Ron Shapiro, co-founder of Shapiro Negotiation Institute (SNI), has written books about how to prepare for negotiations.  He calls his most important advice the “three D’s”:

  • Draft — prepare a script for how you would like the negotiations to go. This will help you sort out what is important to you and what your goals are. What issues do you want to cover, how should you present your requests and how will you meet the other party’s potential objections?
  • Devil’s advocate — review your Draft with someone who can help you find the right way to say what you are going to say, as well as to avoid saying anything you might regret saying. Find a person who has been in your situation and can think of problems you might not anticipate.
  • Deliver — practice with a coach so you become confident and comfortable with your message. You never want to let the other side see you sweat.

If you need help preparing for a major negotiation, find someone who has been there and done that before. An attorney who has represented clients in major litigation as well as served as a neutral mediator and arbitrator is well-suited to play that role. Attorney Michael A. Pollack is one such attorney. Whether your goal is a better job, a better salary, a business acquisition or disposition, or an end to an aggravating dispute, let Michael Pollack help you to prepare and practice. Then, as they say in the theatre, “Break a leg!”

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