All that glitters . . . 
Monday, April 13, 2015 at 5:08PM
Attorney Michael A. Pollack in arbitration, dispute resolution, fear, litigation, mediation, negotiation, settlement, weakness

This past weekend, I went to see the movie Woman in Gold. It is based on the true story of a holocaust survivor, Maria Altmann, who convinced a young attorney to help her recover some paintings that belonged to her aunt and uncle before WWII, but were taken by the Nazis in Austria. She tried to get the Austrian government to voluntarily return them to her, but they refused. So she sued the Republic of Austria in the United States. Of course, Austria claimed sovereign immunity. The U.S. District Court rejected Austria’s motion to dismiss, and the Court of Appeals affirmed. The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review it, and again ruled against Austria. That meant the case would return to the District Court for a trial on the merits. At that point, Mrs. Altmann offered to submit to mediation, suggesting that she might agree to allow one or more of the paintings to remain in Austria on public display, in exchange for a certain sum of money. The Austrians refused to negotiate or submit to mediation. However, they did agree to submit to binding arbitration in Austria. Surprisingly, they lost again, even on their home turf. Finally, if the movie got it right, the Austrians suggested a negotiated settlement. Too late. Mrs. Altmann took the paintings back to the United States, where there are now on display in New York City.

As a mediator, I was pleased to see litigation, mediation and arbitration depicted so accurately. I frequently encounter people who do not know the difference. Litigation and arbitration are win-lose propositions. Mediation can lead to a win-win solution. The Austrians could have kept at least some of the paintings in Austria and saved face, as well as creating some good public relations. Instead, they chose litigation and then arbitration, and lost everything, including some good will and (for them) a bad precedent.

It is not unusual for me to hear people say “why should I mediate when I know I’m going to win in court?” They think agreeing to mediation is a sign of weakness and shows that they have some fear they might lose. My job is to convince people that there is nothing to fear in trying mediation. Normally, nothing that is said or done in mediation is admissable evidence if the case does not settle and goes to trial. Many times, the parties find they have interests that cannot be satisfied by a court, even if they win. Outcomes in mediation are not limited to what a court could do. It can be a very creative process, limited only by the parties’ willingness to search for a win-win solution and to look beyond the immediate legal battle. The things I enjoy most about being a mediator are helping people to put their legal battles behind them expeditiously and finding solutions that both (or all) parties can live with. Saving time and money can often be a pleasant by-product.  

Article originally appeared on Southeast Wisconsin dispute resolution services (http://mpmediation.com/).
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